Mock Pompey

an anonymous farce


About the Play

  • Known only from a single reference in Dryden’s 1674 pamphlet Notes and Observations on the Empress of Morocco, this play, if it was not simply a joke by Dryden or one of his collaborators, appears to have been a rhyming farce, likely never published and now lost.
  • The history of Pompey and his war with Caesar was a popular subject for early English playwrights; for a complete list of plays published or attested to on the subject, see the entry for Caesar and Pompey (1607).


    References from Secondary Sources

    • Dohn Dryden et al., Notes and Observations on the Empress of Morocco (1674)

      Cudden:—Some people mistake this Play, and think it a Tragedy; I take it to be the meryest Rhiming Farce that I ever saw, much beyond Mock Pompey, old Simpleton the Smith,—or any of that Kind.

    • James O. Halliwell, A Dictionary of Old English Plays (1860)

      MOCK POMPEY. This seems to have been a droll. It is mentioned as a rhyming farce, with Simpleton the Smith, in Notes and Observations on the Empress of Morocco, 1674, p. 23.

    • William Carew Hazlitt, The Play-Collector's Manual (1892)

      Mock Pompey: This seems to have been a droll. It is mentioned as a rhyming farce, with Simpleton the Smith, in Notes and Observations on the Empress of Morocco, 1674, p. 23.